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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jan 6, 2011 7:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Good response on the first go-around, however - not to, too many suprises.

1973 - 1993

Chinatown

American Graffiti

Jaws

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

All The President's Men

Close Encounters Of The Third Kind

Raiders Of The Lost Ark

Goodfellas

Unforgiven

Basic Instinct

Sometimes it's difficult for folks to imagine anyone listening to the same ol Grateful Dead Music Day-in and Day-out. Thanks to the IA, we've enjoyed the opportunity to listen to & evaluate any number of a thousand or so shows that we never had the pleasure to experience before.

Once you've seen the Top 300 Films from the Great American Cultural Period, where do we go from here?


This post was modified by dark.starz on 2011-01-07 03:48:29

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Poster: Finster Baby Date: Jan 6, 2011 7:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993


Shawshank Redemption

Eight Men Out

Rob Roy

Forrest Gump

Resevoir Dogs

Cuckoo's Nest

Silence Of The Lambs

Good Fellas

Bull Durham

Dead Man Walking



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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jan 6, 2011 8:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Shawshank - Good Call! Tim Robbins, Morgan Freeman gotta love the layerings and the interplay of the metaphors in this Great American Classic!

Zihuatanejo Mexico - Nahuan for "place of women!"

This post was modified by dark.starz on 2011-01-07 04:25:07

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Poster: Yankee9 Date: Jan 6, 2011 8:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

You're so right about Goodfellas and Shawshank. For some reason I thought these were post 1993. Eight Men Out is incredible also.

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Dead Man Walking is a powerful film. It began a process which changed my views on the DP.

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Poster: waynecs Date: Jan 9, 2011 9:02am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Any list from that era w/o Apocalypse Now is a joke,plain and simple.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 7, 2011 6:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

First off, lets make sure there is one: Does everyone agree that if we take this top ten (anyone's above, but it has to have Cuckoo, has to have KillingFields, has to have Annie Hall, has to have Amer Graf...?), and compare with previous, earlier period top ten, it's NO comparison?

IE, that once again, earlier is "better"?

If you do agree, and no problem if you don't, dumbass, then the question is "why?"

Is it simply that we need a few decades to really come to grips with what is "best"? IE, we are too "close" to recent movies?

Or, is it that movies are somewhat lesser these days? I doubt this is strictly speaking true.

My notion is that it depends entirely on how you experienced them, time period you were raised in, etc., etc., coupled with actors USED to be generally much better (there are many exceptions, Rob will alert me to, cause we both love many of them) than they are today, in general.

Think of great ones, Hollywood stars of the day, and then think of those around now. There are no Bogies, Pecks or Newmans and Brandos walking around these days are there?

What's your take? Another case of early era wins, per usual?

;)

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Poster: fireeagle Date: Jan 7, 2011 7:04am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

killing fields is british

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

Ah--did forget that; good catch.

What say you to the general proposition?

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

I think most films out of 'Hollywood' or through that system have declined dramatically. Superheros, formulaic RomCom's, CGI green screen city, sequel's wrung dry of any juice, chases scenes galore, vampires, and Rob Zombies self declared 'torture porn'. It's boring. Maybe we aren't even the market anymore. Maybe it's all downstream revenue from Asia the Hollywood 'exec's' are looking for.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Jan 7, 2011 7:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

If you're going to go for 'earlier is better' then you have to go earlier than 1954 in my view. For example, these unsurpassed classics from 1940 to 1953.

Fantasia
The Grapes of Wrath
The Philadelphia Story
Citizen Kane
The Maltese Falcon
Casablanca
Double Indemnity
Meet Me In St Louis
To Have and Have Not
The Lost Weekend
The Big Sleep
It's A Wonderful Life
My Darling Clementine
The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
White Heat
Sunset Boulevard
An American In Paris
The Day the Earth Stood Still
Strangers on a Train
High Noon
Singin'in the Rain
Shane

(and I'd take the last three on that list ahead of just about anything else on any other list)

Did I miss anything significant?

Got to agree with you on star quality of today versus yesterday. Bogart and Bacall or Pitt and Jolie? No contest, none whatsoever.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

Ah...concordance is a beautiful thing, eh?

I would only pt out that you forgot (I am sure it was just a slip), one of my TOP TEN all time: Petrified Forest, with not only our friend, Bogie, but another we've spoken of, from your side of the pond, Leslie Howard (a great). Not to mention, Betty D.

I have watched that many times with my artsy son--he considers it one of the all time greats, which surprises me for a "kid", if you take my meaning.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:31am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

Ah, yes, your point very well taken, but Petrified Forest was 1936 and I only went from 1940 to 1953.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What's the problem?

Gotcha; missed that tidbit!

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Jan 6, 2011 8:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

These are worthy of mention for that time frame:
Apocalypse Now
Chinatown
Annie Hall
Nashville
Taxi Driver
Network
Deer Hunter
Amadeus (partial to because lots filmed in Prague and love Forman - see Cuckoo's Nestt, Larry Flynnt, etc., but best are his Czech films)
Do The Right Thing (Spike has the best soundtracks)

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jan 7, 2011 7:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Taxi Driver - Good Call! Breakout Film for Martin Scorcese, Robert Dinero, Jodi Foster & Harvey Keitel.

- dark as new york dark can get -

This post was modified by dark.starz on 2011-01-07 15:46:46

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Jan 7, 2011 9:12am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Love Amadeus.
Went to my Senior Prom dressed as Wolfy, complete with the hair.

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Poster: fireeagle Date: Jan 7, 2011 7:46am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

UP IN SMOKE

the long riders
dances with wolves
1 flew over the cuckoos nest
apocalypse now
robo cop
predator
close encounters of the third kind
pat garrett and billy the kid
young guns

This post was modified by fireeagle on 2011-01-07 15:46:54

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Poster: portmcgroin Date: Jan 7, 2011 6:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Enter the Dragon
Diehard
Edward Scissorhands
Dazed and Confused
the Hunt for Red October
Blue Velvet
BLUES BROTHERS
Vacation
Caddyshack
Full Metal Jacket
+ Alien 1&2

This post was modified by portmcgroin on 2011-01-08 02:57:30

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Poster: helenbuckeeta Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:07am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Blue Velvet
Point Break
JFK
Dances with Wolves
Witness
Blues Brothers
Trading Places
My Cousin Vinnie
True Romance
The Shining


This post was modified by helenbuckeeta on 2011-01-07 16:07:46

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Poster: roughyed Date: Jan 7, 2011 7:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

My Cousin Vinnie??? It only had one funny line: "What's a grit?"

Slapshot

This post was modified by roughyed on 2011-01-07 15:19:57

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Poster: portmcgroin Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:13am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

how about two ewts(youths) from Vinny that line still cracks me up. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpNgONH2ncI&;feature=related

This post was modified by portmcgroin on 2011-01-07 16:13:44

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Poster: roughyed Date: Jan 7, 2011 12:59pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

just watched your link, and, in contemporary parlance, LOL!!

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Jan 7, 2011 1:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

It's 'yout', not 'ewt', as in Linton Kwesi Johnson's 'Want Fi Go Rave':

I woz
waakin doun di road
annadah day
w´en ah hear annadah yout-man say

him seh:
mi naw wok fi noh pittance
mi naw draw dem assistance
mi use to run a lickle rackit
but wha, di police dem di stap it
an ah had woz to hap it

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Poster: helenbuckeeta Date: Jan 7, 2011 2:45pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

It's a reasonable comedy, good final performance from Fred Gwynne, what can i say, just can't get enough of Marisa Tomei.

She won the Supporting Actress Academy Award that year for more than just her derriere. Perhaps you are correct though, it doesn't hit the top ten bar, but beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

I'm sure many folks view American Graffiti and Caddyshack as fluff.


This post was modified by helenbuckeeta on 2011-01-07 22:45:23

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Poster: roughyed Date: Jan 7, 2011 12:55pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Fred Gwynne's judge - you're right. Just didn't think the film was funny.

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Poster: high flow Date: Jan 7, 2011 1:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Yes, Slapshot......which reminds me....Strange Brew.

No where near top 10, but damn funny. "It's a jelly...".

...and here it is.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5bVm5qsbbM

This post was modified by high flow on 2011-01-07 21:05:24

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Poster: tigerbolt Date: Jan 6, 2011 9:31pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest

True Romance

Apocalypse Now

The Big Lebowski

Goodfellas

Unforgiven

Shawshank Redemption

Thunderbolt and Lightfoot

The Way of the Gun

tied for tenth :)

The Shining

Taxi Driver

American History X

Forrest Gump

Stand by Me

Resevoir Dogs

Deer Hunter

Miller's Crossing

Raising Arizona

Once Upon a Time in America

Love and a .45

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jan 6, 2011 10:17pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

The Big Lebowski is 1998; we'll get there.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Jan 6, 2011 10:23pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

But let me add Bob Roberts (1992) to the mix. Still love that film.

and True Romance has Hopper and Walken going head to head in one of my all time favorite scenes (with dialogue by Tarantino)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tqccyUpnZwA

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Poster: wineland Date: Jan 8, 2011 12:32pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

BD - We have the Reel Music Festval in Portland this week. Do you have any films you worked on in the line up? I was thinking it might be a nice for Mrs. Wine and I to go out to dinner and catch a movie.

http://www.nwfilm.org/screenings/32/287/

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Jan 6, 2011 9:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

How about considering, along with the Obvious Suspects (Star Wars of course, Godfather of course, Annie Hall, and have I mentioned Annie Hall?), some of the following:

Repo Man
Blade Runner
Return of the Secaucus Seven
The Killing Fields
This is Spinal Tap
Platoon
My Dinner With Andre
Rain Man



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Poster: dark.starz Date: Jan 6, 2011 10:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Rain Man, ahh! Dustin & Tom Academy Award Performance in a crowded year.

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

I'll try to read the criteria this time. Whew.

Schindler's List
Paper Moon
One Flew Over
Taxi Driver
Apocalypse Now
All That Jazz
Raging Bull
The Killing Fields
The Last Emperor
Dangerous Liaisons
Au Revoir Les Enfants

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Poster: Yankee9 Date: Jan 6, 2011 8:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

1. Godfather II
2. Star Wars (Empire Strikes Back)
3. Star Wars ( A New Hope)
4. The Exorcist
5. Silence Of The Lambs
6. Tootsie
7. Rocky
8. Jaws
9. Goodfellas
10. Shawshank Redemption
11. The Verdict (gotta mention it. I love this movie)

This post was modified by Yankee9 on 2011-01-07 04:14:44

This post was modified by Yankee9 on 2011-01-07 04:15:38

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Nice list but Shindler's list should be on any top 10 from that era. I'm pretty sure that was a 1993 but I could be wrong

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Poster: Finster Baby Date: Jan 7, 2011 9:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Good call on Schindler's List. I forgot about that one. And, you are indeed correct, it is from 1993.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Jan 7, 2011 10:56am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Unforgiven
Jaws
Annie Hall
Young Frankenstein
Dances with Wolves
American Graffiti
Rocky
Deer Hunter
Good Fellas
Schindler's List
Silence of the Lambs

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Poster: Capt. Cook Date: Jan 6, 2011 9:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

A few others -

Annie Hall
Pulp Fiction
Dreams by Kurosawa
Wild At Heart
Natural Born Killers



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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jan 7, 2011 12:03pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Personally speaking I would add Breaking Away and Being There as well. Overall I think those films are highly regarded but would miss out cracking most people's top 10's though. They would both be very high on my all time list.

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Poster: advokat Date: Jan 7, 2011 1:43pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Good call - both are great films.

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Poster: high flow Date: Jan 7, 2011 12:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

"Refund!? Refund?!" Love that movie.
"It's all them ini foods. Linguini, fetuccini...."

Classic.

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Poster: lobster12 Date: Jan 7, 2011 12:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

It is really great. I love the simplicty of it. For The little 500 ending sequence the final 2 laps are shot as a cover shot. Not cutaways. Really awesome stuff.

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Poster: high flow Date: Jan 7, 2011 12:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Funny coincidence. Just after I posted I received a call from a Mr Fraulini.

I was not aware of the final scene details. Interesting.

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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Jan 7, 2011 5:04am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Tried not to be too obvious, though there were a few obvious ones I couldn't resist.

Badlands
The Exorcist
Bring Me The Head of Alfredo Garcia
Chinatown
Dog Day Afternoon
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
Marathon Man
The Deer Hunter
Halloween
Being There
The Empire Strikes Back
The Shining
Blade Runner
The Thing (John Carpenter remake)
The King of Comedy
Blue Velvet
Full Metal Jacket
The Untouchables
Die Hard
Glory
Unforgiven
Wayne's World

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Jan 7, 2011 8:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Dog Day Afternoon and Blue Velvet are great films.

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Poster: advokat Date: Jan 7, 2011 10:00am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

PABST BLUE RIBBON!

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Jan 7, 2011 10:30am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBeJJYYTN44&;feature=related

I really miss Dennis.
Do you ever meet him?

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Poster: advokat Date: Jan 7, 2011 10:40am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

Nope. All I can say is:

"The man's enlarged my mind. He's a poet warrior in the classic sense. I mean sometimes he'll... uh... well, you'll say "hello" to him, right? And he'll just walk right by you. He won't even notice you. And suddenly he'll grab you, and he'll throw you in a corner, and he'll say, "Do you know that 'if' is the middle word in life? If you can keep your head when all about you are losing theirs and blaming it on you, if you can trust yourself when all men doubt you"... I mean I'm... no, I can't... I'm a little man, I'm a little man, he's... he's a great man! I should have been a pair of ragged claws scuttling across floors of silent seas..."

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Jan 7, 2011 10:59am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

But was he a kind man ?

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Poster: advokat Date: Jan 7, 2011 11:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Part Deux; Top Ten American Films 1973 - 1993

"You know something, man, I know something that you don't
know. That's right, jack. The man is clear in his mind, but his soul is mad. Oh yeah. He's dying, I think. He hates all this, he hates it! But ... the man's ... uh ... he reads poetry out loud, alright? ... And a voice! A voice. ... He likes you because you're still alive. He's got plans for you. Nah, nah, I'm not going to help you, you're going to help him, man. You're going to help him. I mean, what are they going to say, man, when he's
gone, huh? Because he dies, when it dies, man, when it
dies, he dies. What are they going to say about him? What, are they going to say, he was a kind man, he was a wise man, he had plans, he had wisdom? Bullshit, man! Am I going to be the one, that's going to set them straight? Look at me: wrong! ... You!"


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Poster: helenbuckeeta Date: Jan 9, 2011 1:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Dog Day Afternoon : John Cazale


John Cazale

Born John Holland Cazale
August 12, 1935(1935-08-12)
Winchester, Massachusetts, U.S.
Died March 12, 1978(1978-03-12) (aged 42)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1972–1978

John Holland Cazale (English pronunciation: /kəˈzeɪl/, Italian pronunciation: [kaˈzaːle]) (August 12, 1935 – March 12, 1978), was an American film and theater actor. During his six-year film career he appeared in five films, each of which was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture: The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, The Conversation, Dog Day Afternoon and The Deer Hunter.

From his start as an acclaimed theater actor he became one of Hollywood's premiere character actors, starting with Coppola's The Godfather in which he played Fredo Corleone, in the Corleone crime family. "Cazale broke hearts on screen with portrayals of volatile, vulnerable, vacillating men, including Pacino's tragic bank-robbing partner in Dog Day Afternoon," writes David Germain of the Associated Press. He is described as an actor "whose intense face is known to just about any serious cinema fan but whose name often escapes them."

In his final film, The Deer Hunter, he chose to continue acting despite being diagnosed with terminal lung cancer which had spread to his bones, and died in New York City on March 12, 1978, shortly after completing his role. He was 42.

Cazale was characterized as "an amazing intellect, an extraordinary person and a fine, dedicated artist" by Joseph Papp, producer of the New York Shakespeare Festival. A film documentary and tribute about Cazale, titled I Knew It Was You, was an entry at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and featured interviews with Al Pacino, Meryl Streep, Robert De Niro, Gene Hackman, Richard Dreyfuss, Francis Ford Coppola, and Sidney Lumet.

Contents
1 Early career
2 Films
2.1 The Godfather and The Godfather Part II
2.2 Dog Day Afternoon
2.3 The Deer Hunter
3 Legacy
4 Filmography
5 References
6 External links

Early careerAn Italian American, Cazale was born in Winchester, Massachusetts. He graduated high school at Winchester High School He studied drama at Oberlin College and Boston University, from which he graduated. He then moved to New York City and worked as a messenger at Standard Oil, where he met Al Pacino, another aspiring actor.

"When I first saw John, I instantly thought he was so interesting," recalled Pacino. "Everybody was always around him because he had a very congenial way of expressing himself." While living together in a communal house in Provincetown, Massachusetts, Cazale and Pacino were cast in a play by Israel Horovitz, The Indian Wants the Bronx, for which they both won Obie Awards. He later won another Obie for the leading role in Horovitz's Line, where he was noticed by Godfather casting director Fred Roos, who then suggested him to director Francis Ford Coppola.

Cazale had acted on stage with Robert De Niro and Cazale's fiancée at the time of his death, Meryl Streep, whom he met when they were both in the Public Theater's 1976 production of Measure for Measure. In that role, wrote Mel Gussow of The New York Times, "Mr Cazale, often cast as a quirky, weak outsider, as in The Godfather, here demonstrates sterner mettle as a quietly imperious Angelo who sweeps down, vulturelike, to deposit virtue."[4] He also acted in a short film entitled The American Way, directed by Marvin Starkman in 1962.

The Godfather and The Godfather Part II
in Godfather II Cazale made his feature film debut, alongside old friend Al Pacino, playing the role of Fredo Corleone in Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather. The film broke box office records and made Pacino, Cazale and several previously unknown co-stars famous, and earned him a Golden Globe nomination.

He acted in the same role in 1974 in The Godfather PartII. Bruce Fretts, in Entertainment Weekly, wrote, "Cazale's devastatingly raw turn intensifies the impact of the drama's emotional climax, in which Michael (Pacino) orders Fredo's murder. "John could open up his heart, so it could be hurt," said Dominic Chianese. "That's a talent few actors have."

Twelve years after his death, he appeared in a sixth feature film, The Godfather Part III (1990), in archive footage. The Godfather Part III was also nominated for Best Picture. This marks the unique achievement of John Cazale having every feature film in which he appeared be nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture.

Also in 1974, he co-starred with Gene Hackman in Coppola's The Conversation.

Dog Day Afternoon
In Dog Day Afternoon Cazale again starred alongside Pacino in Sidney Lumet's 1975 film Dog Day Afternoon. The film's screenwriter, Frank Pierson, said "the film had been cast with many of the actors that Al Pacino had worked with in New York, including John Cazale, who was a close friend and collaborator in The Godfather."[6] For his role as Sal, he was nominated for the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor .

Sidney Lumet commentary
"In the screenplay, Cazale's role was written to be a smart-ass street kid. But Al came to me and said, 'Sidney, please, I beg you, read John Cazale for it.' And when John came in I was so discouraged and thought 'Al must be out of his mind.' This guy looks thirty, thirty-two, and that’s the last thing I want in this part. But Al had great taste in actors, and I hadn’t yet seen him in the Godfather. And Cazale came in, and then he read, and my heart broke. . . .


with Meryl Streep, 1978"One of the things that I love about the casting of John Cazale ... was that he had a tremendous sadness about him. I don’t know where it came from; I don’t believe in invading the privacy of the actors that I work with, or getting into their heads. But my god - it’s there - in every shot of him. And not just in this movie, but in Godfather II also.[7]

"When Al asked him during a scene, 'Is there any country you want to go to?' Cazale improvised his answer by saying, after long thought, 'Wyoming.' To me that was the funniest, saddest line in the movie, and my favorite, because in the script he wasn’t supposed to say anything. I almost ruined the take because I started to laugh so hard... but it was a brilliant, brilliant, ad lib."[7]

Al Pacino commentary
"It's great working with John because he has a way of getting involved - in the whole thing, in the characters. He asks so many questions - he was just brilliant. It was tough to sell Johnny, but once Sidney got to see him read, and work with me, it turned out great."[8]

The Deer HunterDespite being diagnosed with terminal lung cancer, Cazale continued work with fiancée Meryl Streep in The Deer Hunter. "I've hardly ever seen a person so devoted to someone who is falling away like John was," said Pacino. "To see her in that act of love for this man was overwhelming."

Director Michael Cimino "rearranged the shooting schedule," wrote author Andy Dougan, "with Cazale and Streep's consent, so that he could film all his scenes first." He completed all his scenes, but died soon after, on March 12, 1978, before the film was finished.[9] He was buried at Holy Cross Cemetery in Malden, Massachusetts.

Legacy
Frame from Godfather II (1974), as Fredo Corleone being embraced by his brother Michael (Al Pacino)Cazale was described by those close to him to be "often shy" and "very emotionally sensitive." Close friend and frequent co-star Pacino collaborated with him on three films and various theater productions. Although he never received an Oscar nomination, wrote Bruce Fretts, he "was the walking embodiment of the aphorism acting is reacting, providing the perfect counterbalance to his recurring costars, the more emotionally volatile Al Pacino and Robert De Niro." Pacino once commented, "All I wanted to do was work with John for the rest of my life. He was my acting partner."

The Boston Globe asks, "Why was Cazale so influential? In part, it was because of his commitment to the craft of acting." To Streep, he was "monomaniacal," which had an effect on his costars, who were then "challenged to take their own games up a notch."

Cazale's image was used for The Godfather video game, as his character, Fredo. He has a theater named after him, the McGinn/Cazale Theatre (currently inhabited by the company Second Stage Theatre), located at 2162 Broadway at 76th Street in New York City. Cazale was cited as a "Distinguished Performance" by the Off-Broadway Obie Awards for the 1967-68 season for his performance in Israel Horovitz's play The Indian Wants the Bronx.

His life and career was profiled in the documentary film, I Knew It Was You, directed by Richard Shepard, which premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and was scheduled by HBO.

Filmography
Poster for a 2008 bio-documentary filmJohn Cazale appeared in five full-length feature films while alive, plus a sixth using archival footage, after his death. All six films were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Picture. Three of the films won the Award: The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, and The Deer Hunter.

Release date Film Role Notes
March 15, 1972 The Godfather Fredo Corleone
April 7, 1974 The Conversation Stan
December 12, 1974 The Godfather: Part II Fredo Corleone
September 21, 1975 Dog Day Afternoon Salvatore Naturile Nominated — Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Motion Picture
December 8, 1978 The Deer Hunter Stanley "Stosh"
December 25, 1990 The Godfather: Part III Fredo Corleone (archive footage)

References1.^ Germain, David. "Sundance doc wants people to know 'it's Cazale'." Associated Press. January 18, 2009.
2.^ a b I Knew it was You. 2009 Sundance Film Festival entry, Short Films, U.S.A., 2008, 40 mins.
3.^ a b c d Fretts, Bruce. "Unfortunate Son". Entertainment Weekly. Feb. 21, 2003.
4.^ a b "John Cazale, Actor on Stage and Screen". New York Times. 1978-03-14. http://select.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=FB0E17FD3D5513728DDDAD0994DB405B888BF1D3. Retrieved 2009-10-13.
5.^ "The American Way (1962)". http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0447603. Retrieved 2009-10-13.
6.^ Pierson, Frank. Dog Day Afternoon, interviews
7.^ a b Lumet, Sidney. Dog Day Afternoon, feature commentary
8.^ Pacino, Al. Dog Day Afternoon, feature commentary
9.^ Dougan, Andy. Untouchable: A Biography of Robert De Niro. (2003) Thunder's Mouth Press.
10.^ "A-list actors recall a short but sterling career" Boston.com, June 1, 2010
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